circulation of matter

Adding nothing but water and heat, further
using all byproducts as valuable resources.
Inspired by the circulation of natural
matter, we applied three main processes such
as burning, boiling and distilling. The
transformed materials are able to go back to
the forest as nutrition. By deconstructing
the tree through this way and later combining
the found elements, we were able to render
new materials that could stand by themselves.

 

 

boiling

boiling

processes

burning

burning

 

 

Boiling the willow provided a way to remove the bark off from the willow. The boiled water became a red based liquid, the willow water. The boiling also helped loosen fibers in the leaves and bark to be pressed together into paper in various recipes. After removing the inner bark you are able to twist the inner bark together into a string. The string can also be dyed by the redness of the water. When the willow water is boiled down to a simmer it becomes a paste. When further boiled down it became a tar-based solution.

 

 

 

 

distilling

distilling

Burning can be used in a number of ways to change properties of willow. Stating the obvious, wood transformes by firing. Applied in certain ways the fire can be used as a wood working tool. For example, charcoal is made by heating the wood slowly in a sealed container with fire all around. By heating the willow in the absence of oxygen it becomes a material consisting only of carbon. Another way we used fire was by applying an ancient Japanese technique of charring wood for preservation. Usually being discarded as trash, the ash from the burning became one of the most interesting elements.

 

 

 

 

The distilling process was utilized to distill ash, leaves, bark and charcoal. Distilling is when you extract by selective evaporation and condensation a liquid that is a pure component. The liquid that was produced during this intricate process led us to ascertain surprising materials and smells.